TEACHING

COURSES TAUGHT

 

Sissies, Studs and Butches: Racialized Masculinities, Effeminacy and Embodiments of Noncompliance

  

 

 

 

 

 

Transforming Justice as Truth to Power: Critical Methodologies and Methods in Participatory Action Research and Community Accountability
 

Spring 2018

 

 

 

 

Entangled Sexuality: Violence, Resistance, Crime, Punishment and Survival

Trans* Identities and Communities: Genealogy, Theory, Praxis and Community Research

Fall 2017

Introduction to Gender Studies: Transnationalism & State Power

Winter 2017

Theories in Asian American Studies: Intersectionality, Feminism and Transnationalism

2016

 

 

This upper-division seminar will investigate the racialization of masculinity (the masculinization of race) as undergirded by heteropatriarchy, settler colonialism, militarized borders and imperialism. This course will challenge Western, hegemonic and inherent legacies of masculinity as modernity's (hu)man. Using critical race theory, feminist, queer/trans* of color critique (e.g., Wynter, Fanon, David Eng, José Muñoz), we will ask how whiteness (white supremacist masculinity) shapes and colors masculinity -- whether as exemplar, visible, illegible, failed, deviant and even toxic -- and what then falls outside of such a frame?

Instructor, Gender Studies & Critical Social Thought, Mount Holyoke College

 

 

This course will offer an overview of select methodologies and methods from Community-based research, Participatory Action Research (PAR), collaborative ethnography and other social justice research interventions such as radical oral history, grassroots research collectives, experimental digital archives, research and data justice networks and organizations. We will center questions of "accountability"; that is, to whom, for whom, and to what end do processes of accountability serve those already in power? Moreover, we will investigate the seeming chasms between academia and activism in order to explore the possibility of unlikely collaborative research alliances.

Instructor, Gender Studies & Critical Social Thought, Mount Holyoke College

 

 

 

Instructor, Department of Gender Studies & Critical Social Thought, Mount Holyoke College  

 

Instructor, Department of Gender Studies & Critical Social Thought, Mount Holyoke College  

 

 

Teaching Assistant, Department of Gender Studies, University of California, Riverside. 

 

Instructor, Department of Ethnic Studies, University of California, Riverside.

Class website

Introduction to Gender, Race and Class

Summer 2016

Co-Instructor, Department of Ethnic Studies, University of California, Riverside. 

 

Transmedia: Community-Engagement Research Project

2013-2014

Instructor, Department of Media & Cultural Studies, University of California, Riverside.

 

Introduction to Cultural Studies 

Summer 2015
Fall/Spring 2013
Summer 2012

Teaching Assistant, Department of Media & Cultural Studies, University of California, Riverside.

 

Introduction to Asian American Comparative Ethnic History

Spring 2014
Fall 2012

Teaching Assistant, Department of Ethnic Studies, University of California, Riverside.

 

Introduction to Ethnic Studies 

Winter 2013
Spring 2013

Teaching Assistant, Department of Ethnic Studies, University of California, Riverside.

 

Introduction to Critical Media Studies

Winter 2012
Winter 2011

Teaching Assistant, Department of Media & Cultural Studies, University of California, Riverside.

 

Intro to Asian American Women’s Experience

Fall 2010

Teaching Assistant, Asian American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles. 

 


SYLLABI

Sexuality, Resistance, Crime and Punishment

2016

Sexuality is often discussed as a thing unto itself. In law, sexuality is largely addressed an conceived of as a singular identity axis of its  own, existing independently of other identities, conditional categories and social phenomena. This course will challenge such typified understandings of sexuality as an exceptional place-marker of difference through the study of theorist Jasbir Puar's use of sexual exceptionalism and sexual citizenship alongside Michele Foucault's discussion of the biopolitical, that is how steate exercises sovereignty and power over populations through a mutual dependence. We will discuss an array of critical race theory that studies the contemporary phenomena of sexual citizenship against sexual criminality, where both exist as highly racialized, class-stratifying, (trans)nationalized, and surveilled processes.

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Theories in Asian American Studies

Summer 2016

This course will critically investigates core theoretical arguments about the site and field of Asian American studies, its function/resistance in the university and the political global world, and at its inception an unapologetic political project inextricably tied to the field of ethnic studies, “third world solidarity” and as a site of relation and affinity to Black, indigenous and Latinx social justice movements and radical thought in and outside the university. We will study the ways in which "canonization" and "institutionalization" have impacted and created new challenges in AAS as a field and site of resistance of past, present and future. We will study the relation and role AAS has to the growing call for "diversity" in the US, and in which ways the field might create alternative logics and modes of doing and thinking that does not become inured by a post-racial discourse. We will conclude to examine how burgeoning fields like Pacific Islander Studies, South East Asian studies, Arab American studies, Middle Eastern studies, mixed race studies, refugee studies, diaspora studies, queer/trans of color critique and transnational studies (and many more) create a moving and dynamic intervention that forces traditional notions of AAS to move and been transformed.

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Women, Queer and Trans* of Color Genealogies: Theories, Practices and Community Research

Women/Queer/Trans* of Color Genealogies (WQToC, respectively: WoC, QoC, ToC) focuses on the knowledge and cultural production produced by communities multiply marginalized by categories of race, gender, sexuality, class, ability, citizenship and location. We will explore the overlaps and tensions between and internal to “women of color”, “queer of color” and “trans* of color” communities through nontraditional multimedia archives of affect, grief, desire, loss, belonging/unbelonging, performativity, love, liberation, contradictions and identitarian politics. The course is not intended to give any complete archive of such genealogies, rather, it will be an exploration of how such counter genealogies provoke other-worldly analyses and ways of relating to power, feeling, futurity and memory/memorialization. This syllabus provides a curated selection of works, and is not a survey of all WQToC works, rather this course 2 is intending to provoke critical dialogue with these select texts in order to build a framework for further investigation for upper-division courses in the program of Gender and Women’s Studies.

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